Clinton camp releases candidate's clean bill of health, tax returns | us news

Clinton camp releases candidate’s clean bill of health, tax returns

1 Aug 2015 | Author: | No comments yet »

At a Glance: A Look at Hillary Clinton’s Medical Background.

WASHINGTON (AP) — Dozens of emails that traversed Hillary Clinton’s private, unsecure home server contain national security information now deemed too sensitive to make public, according to the latest batch of records released Friday. Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton released a letter from her doctor Friday that declared her to be in “excellent physical condition and fit to serve as president of the United States.” Clinton is a “healthy 67-year-old female whose current medical conditions include hypothyroidism and seasonal pollen allergies,” wrote Dr.The Democratic presidential frontrunner Hillary Clinton has been given a clean bill of health and is “fit to serve”, her personal doctor has announced.

In 2,206 pages of emails, the government censored passages to protect national security at least 64 times in 37 messages, including instances when the same information was blacked-out multiple times. The 67-year-old has no lingering effects from a 2012 concussion that caused a health scare when she was secretary of state, the candidate’s campaign said on Friday. Clinton has said she never sent classified information from her private email server, which The Associated Press was first to identify as operating in her home in New York.

Hypothyroidism is a very common condition, and Bardack said other notable events in her medical history include deep vein thrombosis — or a blood clot, usually in the leg — in 1998 and 2009, a broken elbow in 2009 and a concussion in 2012. Meanwhile, Clinton herself was campaigning at the annual meeting of the National Urban League and calling for an end of the nation’s trade embargo of Cuba during a speech in Miami.

The State Department released a new batch of emails sent via her private server earlier in the day and her campaign also planned to release all her tax returns since her last presidential campaign. Mrs Clinton will be keen to dispel any worries about her health that may still exist within the public mind since she fainted and suffered from concussion after fainting in December 2012 after contracting a stomach virus while traveling abroad.

Bardack concludes that Clinton “participates in a healthy lifestyle” and her most recent exam found “no evidence of additional medical issues or cardiovascular disease. Friday was also the deadline for super PACs to file their first financial reports of the 2016 campaign with federal regulators, revealing the names of a slew of billionaires and millionaires paying for the early days of the election fight. Bardack said testing the following year showed “complete resolution” of the concussion’s effects, including double vision, which she wore glasses with specialized lenses to address.

Some of the documents could reflect favorably on Clinton, such as a message in August 2009 about a 10-year-old old Yemeni girl who had been married and divorced, and had been portrayed as unhappy in a CNN story. Her total cholesterol was 195; her LDL or “bad” cholesterol was 118, and her HDL or “good” cholesterol was 64 — all within healthy levels and not signaling the need for any medications. “There’s no red flags there,” said Dr.

The Clintons paid nearly $44 million in federal taxes and made almost $15 million in charitable contributions from the tens of millions the couple earned between 2007 and 2014, according to her campaign. Others could be controversial, such as 2009 messages from former national security adviser Sandy Berger about how to pressure Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu over negotiations with Palestinians. The couple earlier reported having earned more than $30 million from speeches and book royalties since mid-2013 In a statement, Clinton emphasized that she came into her wealth later in her life — an effort to draw a distinction with Bush, the scion of a rich political family. Clinton is the first 2016 presidential candidate to release her health records, part of an effort by her campaign to compete with Republican presidential candidate Jeb Bush on the issue of transparency. On the campaign trail, she frequently mentions her middle-class upbringing in a Chicago suburb and the loans she and former President Bill Clinton used to fund their education. “We’ve come a long way from my days going door-to-door for the Children’s Defense Fund and earning $16,450 as a young law professor in Arkansas — and we owe it to the opportunities America provides,” she said.

Aides said Friday Clinton will release more details about her finances than Bush, the former Florida governor who has already made public 33 years of his tax returns. Bush has earned nearly $28 million since leaving the Florida governor’s mansion in 2007 and paid an effective federal income tax rate of roughly 36 percent in the past three decades, according to tax returns released by his campaign last month. The latter is a blood thinner that is used to prevent new blood clots from forming. “Her Coumadin dose is monitored regularly and she has experienced no side-effects from her medications,” Bardack wrote. Both candidates are in the top 1 percent of taxpayers, who paid an average of 30.2 percent between 1981 and 2011, according to figures from the Congressional Budget Office. Clinton’s decision not to use a State Department email account has become a political problem for her, as Republicans seize on the disclosures to paint her as untrustworthy and willing to break rules for personal gain.

There was no mention of Clinton’s height or weight, but it did say Clinton gets routine mammograms and breast ultrasounds, as well colonoscopies and gynecological exams. Clinton’s doctor said she exercises regularly — practicing yoga, swimming, walking, and weight training — and eats a diet rich in lean proteins, vegetables and fruits. The inspector general said his office has found four emails containing classified information while reviewing a limited sample of 40 of the emails provided by Clinton. Lisa Bardack, an internist and chairman of the Department of Medicine at the Mount Kisco Medical Group near the candidate’s suburban New York home, publicly detailed Clinton’s health in a two-page letter. Grassley wrote a letter to FBI Director James Comey asking him to explain what the FBI is doing to ensure that classified information contained on Kendall’s thumb drive is secured and not further disseminated.

Republican strategist Karl Rove later cast the incident as a “serious health episode” that would be an issue if Clinton ran for president, fueling a theory the concussion posed a graver threat to her abilities than Clinton and her team let on. Clinton emailed Feltman about an “Egyptian proposal” for separate signings of a reconciliation deal with Hamas after the militant organization balked at attending a unity ceremony. George Mitchell, then the special envoy for Middle East Peace, is also censored as classified despite the fact that Clinton did not send the original message on a secure channel.

Mitchell later responded to Clinton that “the Egyptian document has been received and is being translated.” The September 2009 issue was over the candidacy of an Egyptian official who had once threatened to burn Israeli books. Previous emails released by the agency revealed that Clinton received information on her private account about the deadly 2012 attack on U.S. diplomatic facilities in Benghazi, Libya, that was retroactively classified as “secret” at the request of the FBI. On several occasions, Clinton received messages not only at her home email server — hdr22@clintonemail.com — but also on a BlackBerry email account through her cellphone provider. The regular releases of Clinton’s correspondence all but guarantee a slow drip of revelations from the emails throughout the Democratic presidential primary campaign, complicating her efforts to put the issue to rest. The goal is for the department to publicly unveil all 55,000 pages of her emails by Jan. 29, 2016 — just three days before Iowa caucus-goers cast the first votes in the Democratic primary contest.

Twitter-news
Our partners
Follow us
Contact us
Our contacts

About this site