Colorado high school sexting scandal: How to deal with nude photos

8 Nov 2015 | Author: | No comments yet »

Colorado high school sexting scandal: How to deal with nude photos.

A community in southern Colorado is reeling with shock as authorities investigate an apparent case of sexting involving at least 100 students at Canon City High School. The revelation has left parents outraged, administrators searching for missed clues, and the police and the district attorney’s office debating whether to file child pornography charges — including felony charges — against some of the participants. On Thursday night, separate community meetings were held for parents of football players and those of other stuOn Thursday night, separate community meetings were held for parents of football players and those of other students to address the scandal, which has shocked this quiet, semirural community of 16,000. The investigation began Monday after school administrators received student reports and anonymous tips through “Safe2Tell,” a state-funded student safety hotline. The Denver Post reports, “At least one of the cellphones containing nude pictures had an application in which an icon of a calculator was the entrance to a password-protected cache of nude photographs.

But because most of the people at fault are themselves minors and, in some cases, took pictures of themselves and sent them to others, law enforcement officials are at a loss as to how to proceed. “Consenting adults can do this to their hearts’ content,” said Thom LeDoux, the district attorney, but “if the subject is under the age of 18, that’s a problem.” He added that he was not interested in arresting hundreds of children and would “use discretion” if he decided to file charges. The photo-sharing was done largely on cellphone applications called “vault apps” that look innocent enough — like calculators — but are really secret troves of photographs accessible with a password. Anne Collier, a blogger on youth online safety writes in The Christian Science Monitor, “educators and parents who discuss sexting with teenagers often fail to recognize that young people are, in fact, competent, moral thinkers that with diverse reasons for and opinions about sexting. “ Quoting Sydney-based researcher and author Nina Funnell, Ms.

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