Early season snowstorm coats Midwestern US, affects travel

22 Nov 2015 | Author: | No comments yet »

Early Snowstorm Blankets Parts of Midwest US.

Nov. 20, 2015: Jim Paulson, of Sioux Falls, shovels part of his driveway before using the snow blower to clear the rest during the first snow of the season in Sioux Falls. (AP) CHICAGO – The first significant wintry storm of the season blanketed parts of the Midwest with a foot of snow and more was on the way Saturday, creating hazardous conditions as some travelers prepared to depart for the Thanksgiving holiday. The National Weather Service said the snow, which first fell in South Dakota, Minnesota and Iowa on Friday, would continue in Illinois, Indiana and Michigan before heading northeast into Canada late Saturday. While winter has not officially begun, the shovels and snowblowers were out from South Dakota and southern Minnesota, to Iowa, Wisconsin and northern Illinois.

About 60 miles northwest of Chicago, the village of Capron had received 14.6 inches by midmorning Saturday, spurring village employee Robert Lukes into action clearing sidewalks with his snowblower in the community of about 1,400 people. Chicago’s O’Hare airport picked up more than 7 inches of snow leading to the cancelation of nearly 600 incoming and outgoing flights by early evening. He said the snowfall was wet, with a layer of slush underneath that made the work slow-going. ‘‘It’s a typical first snow for us, but it’s a pain in the butt. The snowfall is “right on track” for the season, said Richard Otto, lead forecaster at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Weather Prediction Center. The Illinois Tollway, which maintains interstate tollways in 11 counties of the state, said it had 185 snowplows ready to go and 84,000 tons of salt stockpiled for the winter.

Nathan Ludwig said troopers in northern and western Iowa were seeing many cars in ditches, especially near Mason City and Council Bluffs, the Des Moines Register reported.

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