‘Slender Man’ Stabbing Trial Delayed for Court of Appeals Ruling

23 Sep 2015 | Author: | No comments yet »

Slender Man stabbing case suspended as officials consider suspects’ adult status.

Two Wisconsin teenagers are due back in court on charges of trying to kill a classmate by stabbing her multiple times to satisfy the fictitious Internet character known as the Slender Man.A Wisconsin judge on Monday indefinitely halted the case of two teenage girls accused of stabbing their classmate to please the fictional Internet character Slenderman while lawyers appeal for it to be moved to juvenile court, court records show. Attorneys for the girls, both aged 13 at the time of the 2014 attack, are expected to ask a Waukesha County judge Monday to adjourn the case to a later time or place and to suppress some statements.

Investigators say the girls lured Payton to a park in the Milwaukee suburb of Waukesha where they stabbed her 19 times in an effort to appease the online fictional character Slender Man. The state Court of Appeals had previously denied defense requests to reverse Waukesha Circuit Judge Michael Bohren’s decision last month to try the girls in adult court. Authorities said the two girls, then 12 years old, stabbed their classmate 19 times and left her for dead in the woods in Waukesha, about 20 miles west of Milwaukee. Under Wisconsin law, it is mandatory for cases to begin in adult trial if they involve suspects at least 10 years old who are charged with first-degree attempted intentional homicide.

The girls reportedly planned the killing as early as February 2014; the attack occurred that June. “Some juvenile justice experts say such a motive points to a confused mental state or stunted emotional development – reasons often cited for not trying minors as adults,” the Monitor’s Mark Guarino wrote. But if the girls are convicted as adults, they could face up to 65 years behind bars – and in Wisconsin, juveniles over the age of 10 charged with homicide or attempted homicide are automatically tried as adults.

Charging the girls as adults was “the right thing to do,” Bonnie Ladwig, a former Republican representative who authored the new law, told CBS News last year.

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