Superintendent admits mistake in hiring man with rap sheet

26 Aug 2015 | Author: | No comments yet »

Arrest warrant issued for New Mexico school administrator facing sex abuse.

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — The embattled superintendent of Albuquerque schools says he made a mistake in hiring an administrator facing child sex abuse charges.More than 24 hours after a warrant was issued for his arrest, former Albuquerque Public School deputy superintendent Jason Martinez had yet to surrender to Denver authorities Tuesday for failing to comply with conditions of his pretrial release on two felony criminal cases. Luis Valentino told the Albuquerque Journal (http://goo.gl/4wvJ5E) on Tuesday he is upset with himself for not being aware of Jason Martinez’s many legal problems Susana Martinez has requested a prompt audit of whether New Mexico school regions are leading opportune criminal record verifications of new representatives in light of disclosures that an abnormal state Albuquerque region director was contracted in spite of confronting kid sex misuse indictments in Colorado.

The school board in Albuquerque will be voting this week on an agenda item as to whether or not Valentino will be fired. “It’s upsetting to know someone would be allowed to even walk in the doors with that record”, said Angela Gonzales-Carver, a parent advocate from Albuquerque who serves on a programs committee for the National Parent Teacher Association. Denver District Attorney’s spokeswoman Lynn Kimbrough told the Journal Tuesday that prosecutors in her office have been in contact with Martinez’s attorney, Leonard Martinez of Denver, to arrange for the arrest.

This after Albuquerque’s school district hired Jason Martinez, a high-level administrator who faces six counts of sexual assault on a child in Colorado, according to our media partner the Las Cruces Sun News. Late Monday, Denver District Judge Martin Egelhoff granted the DA’s motion to revoke Martinez’s existing bail on the charges and issue an arrest warrant. Valentino also stressed that Martinez was his pick, and his alone, for deputy superintendent – selected for his exceptional ability with curriculum – and that Gov. He past filled in as an innovation overseer for Denver Public Schools. “This assertion is so false and over-the-top that we will be recording an objection with the state bar against the legal advisor and test her accomplice – who is a chosen official – to consent to leave from office when he is not able to substantiate this silly case about the senator”, Martinez representative Chris Sanchez said. By accepting the employment in Albuquerque, Martinez abused terms in his pretrial discharge, which obliged him to get authorization from the court before going outside of Colorado, not to mention moving for all time to take a prominent open occupation.

Luis Valentino said Martinez would not have been hired if authorities had known of the charges. “APS dropped the ball, and it’s completely unacceptable”, Governor Martinez said. But two weeks after Martinez came onboard, on July 15, APS Interim Superintendent for Human Resources Karen Rudys told Valentino that Martinez had not provided his fingerprints for the mandatory criminal background check. But after he resigned, Martinez was deemed “ineligible to rehire,” Jones said, adding that he couldn’t say why on the advice of the district’s attorney. Under that level of supervision, he was supposed to check in with Pretrial Services by telephone one to four times a month and meet for case management once or twice monthly.

A new release from the governor says DPS and PED will review how policies can be strengthened and improved, and will look to find any people and districts who have not completed criminal background checks. Valentino, in a memo to the APS Board of Education titled “Timeline,” lists meetings with Rudys on July 2, Aug. 5 and Aug. 12, noting next to each that there was “no mention is made of Mr. Martinez.” Valentino said he feels district policy should require that background checks be done before employees start work and that the handling of background checks could use improvement. Martinez began his career as a Denver school principal in 2002 and rose through the ranks to become deputy of operations in elementary education for the district. “We’ve been in a full-court press to find out if there were any things inappropriate while he worked here,” Jones said. “We’re open to any new information that comes in, but don’t have any information to suggest that we need to do any more digging.” The Denver DA’s Office alleged in the criminal information against Martinez that he began a pattern of child sexual abuse in 2010. He did acknowledge that he had not checked Martinez’s references before offering him the deputy superintendent position, saying he had heard good things about him from colleagues over the years.

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